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Endocrine

, Volume 58, Issue 3, pp 595–596 | Cite as

Comment on 'Association between serum osteocalcin and body mass index: a systematic review and meta-analysis.'

  • Xiaoying Liu
  • Kaye E. Brock
  • Tara C. Brennan-Speranza
Letter to the Editor
  • 133 Downloads

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoying Liu
    • 1
  • Kaye E. Brock
    • 1
  • Tara C. Brennan-Speranza
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia

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