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Endocrine

, Volume 44, Issue 3, pp 634–647 | Cite as

Colorectal cancer association with metabolic syndrome and its components: a systematic review with meta-analysis

  • Katherine EspositoEmail author
  • Paolo Chiodini
  • Annalisa Capuano
  • Giuseppe Bellastella
  • Maria Ida Maiorino
  • Concetta Rafaniello
  • Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos
  • Dario Giugliano
Meta-Analysis

Abstract

We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of the empirical evidence on the association of metabolic syndrome and its components with colorectal cancer incidence and mortality. A systematic literature search of multiple electronic databases was conducted and complemented by cross-referencing to identify studies published before 31 October 2012. Every included study was to report risk estimates with 95 % confidence intervals for the association between metabolic syndrome and colorectal cancer (incidence or mortality). Core items of identified studies were independently extracted by two reviewers, and results were summarized by standard methods of meta-analysis. We identified 17 studies, which reported on 49 data sets with 11,462 cancer cases. Metabolic syndrome was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in both men (RR: 1.33, 95 % CI 1.18–1.50, and 1.36, 1.25–1.48, respectively) and women (RR: 1.41, 1.18–1.70, and 1.16, 1.03–1.30, respectively). The risk estimates changed little depending on type of study (cohort vs non cohort), populations (US, Europe, Asia), cancer site (colon and rectum), or definition of the syndrome. The risk estimates for any single factor of the syndrome were significant for higher values of BMI/waist (RR: 1.19, 95 % CI 1.10–1.28), dysglycemia (RR: 1.29, 1.11–1.49), and higher blood pressure (RR: 1.09, 1.01–1.18). Dysglycemia and/or higher BMI/waist explained most of the risk associated with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer incidence and mortality in both sexes. The risk conveyed by the full syndrome is not superior to the sum of its parts.

Keywords

Colorectal cancer Metabolic syndrome Incidence Mortality Meta-analysis 

Notes

Conflict of interest

None.

Supplementary material

12020_2013_9939_MOESM1_ESM.docx (350 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 350 kb)
12020_2013_9939_MOESM2_ESM.docx (26 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOCX 25 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Katherine Esposito
    • 1
    • 6
    Email author
  • Paolo Chiodini
    • 2
  • Annalisa Capuano
    • 3
  • Giuseppe Bellastella
    • 4
  • Maria Ida Maiorino
    • 4
  • Concetta Rafaniello
    • 3
  • Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos
    • 5
  • Dario Giugliano
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Cardio-thoracic and Respiratory SciencesSecond University of NaplesNaplesItaly
  2. 2.Department of Medicine and Public HealthSecond University of NaplesNaplesItaly
  3. 3.Department of Experimental MedicineSecond University of NaplesNaplesItaly
  4. 4.Department of Geriatrics and Metabolic DiseasesSecond University of NaplesNaplesItaly
  5. 5.Department of Nutrition and DieteticsHarokopio UniversityAthensGreece
  6. 6.Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolic DiseasesNaplesItaly

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