Advertisement

Endocrine

, Volume 43, Issue 1, pp 233–235 | Cite as

Ghrelin concentrations in maternal and cord blood of Type 1 diabetic and non-diabetic pregnancies at term

  • Mark P. Hehir
  • Henriette Laursen
  • Mary F. Higgins
  • Donal J. Brennan
  • Darran P. O’Connor
  • Fionnuala M. McAuliffe
Research Letter

Introduction

Pre-existing Type 1 Diabetes mellitus (T1DM) complicates 1–2 % of all pregnancies and is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality [1, 2]. The risk of congenital malformations, polyhydramnios, pre-term delivery, pre-eclampsia, caesarean delivery, and fetal macrosomia (large for dates infant) are increased compared with non-diabetic pregnancies. Even amongst pre-gestational diabetic women with antenatal normoglycaemia, the risk of macrosomia and perinatal complications is still increased [3].

Ghrelin is a 28-amino acid peptide and is the endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor. It is involved in the control of food intake, energy balance, and utilisation of fat during pregnancy [4]. Ghrelin belongs to a group called the adipocytokines, which also includes leptin, and have functions in appetite and satiety but have also been shown to play integral roles in fetal growth and development [5].

Ghrelin is synthesised primarily in the...

Keywords

Glycaemic Control Fetal Growth Ghrelin Level Diabetic Mother Ghrelin Concentration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

References

  1. 1.
    Confidential Enquiry into Maternal and Child Health. Pregnancy in women with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes in 2002–2003. England, Wales and Northern Ireland. CEMACH, London, 2005Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    N. Corrigan, D.P. Brazil, F. Mc Auliffe, Fetal cardiac effects of maternal hyperglycaemia during pregnancy. Birth Defects Res. A 85(6), 523–530 (2009)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    M.F. Higgins, N.M. Russell, C.H. Mulcahy, M. Coffey, M.E. Foley, F.M. McAuliffe, Fetal anterior abdominal wall measurement in diabetic pregnancy. Eur. J. Obstet. Gynecol. Reprod. Biol. 40(1), 43–47 (2008)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    E. Budak, M. Fernandez Sanchez, J. Bellver, A. Cervero, C. Simon, A. Pellicer, Interactions of the hormones leptin, ghrelin, adiponectin, resistin, and PYY3-36 with the reproductive system. Fertil. Steril. 85(6), 1563–1581 (2006)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    M. Higgins, F. McAuliffe, A review of maternal and fetal growth factors in diabetic pregnancy. Curr. Diabetes Rev. 6(2), 116–125 (2010). ReviewPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    M. O’Brien, P. Earley, J.J. Morrison, T.J. Smith, Ghrelin in the human myometrium. Reprod. Biol. Endocrinol. 28(8), 55 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Hehir MP, Glavey SV, Morrison JJ: Uterorelaxant effect of ghrelin on human myometrial contractility. Am. J. Obstet. Gynecol. 198(3):323.e321–325 (2008)Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    L. Soriano-Guillen, V. Barrios, A. Campos-Baros, J. Argente, Ghrelin concentrations in obesity and anorexia nervosa: effect of weight reduction or recuperation. J. Pediatr. 144, 36–42 (2004)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    M. Aslan, O. Celik, N. Celik, I. Turkcuoglu, E. Yilmaz, A. Karaer, Y. Simsek, E. Celik, S. Aydin, Cord blood nesfatin-1 and apelin-36 levels in gestational diabetes mellitus. Endocrine 41(3), 424–429 (2012)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    K. Kos, W.K. Syn, K.C. Lewandowski, J. Bennett, C.U. Nwokolo, J.P. O’Hare, H. Randeva, Comparison of maternal ghrelin and leptin in healthy mothers and mothers with Type 1 diabetes. Diabet. Med. 25(12), 1400–1405 (2008)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    M. Weyermann, C. Beermann, H. Brenner, D. Rothenbacher, Adiponectin and leptin in maternal serum, cord blood, and breast milk. Clin. Chem. 52(11), 2095–2102 (2006)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    J.B. Li, A. Asakawa, K. Cheng, Y. Li, H. Chaolu, M. Tsai, A. Inui, Biological effects of obestatin. Endocrine 39(3), 205–211 (2011)PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark P. Hehir
    • 1
  • Henriette Laursen
    • 2
  • Mary F. Higgins
    • 1
  • Donal J. Brennan
    • 1
    • 2
  • Darran P. O’Connor
    • 2
  • Fionnuala M. McAuliffe
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.UCD Obstetrics & Gynaecology, School of Medicine and Medical ScienceUniversity College Dublin, National Maternity HospitalDublin 2Ireland
  2. 2.UCD School of Biomolecular and Biomedical Science, Conway Institute of Biomolecular & Biomedical ResearchUniversity College DublinDublin 4Ireland

Personalised recommendations