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Endocrine

, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 254–259 | Cite as

Selective α1-adrenoceptor antagonist (controlled release tablets) in preoperative management of pheochromocytoma

  • Yu Zhu
  • Hong-chao He
  • Ting-wei Su
  • Yu-xuan Wu
  • Wei-qing Wang
  • Ju-ping Zhao
  • Zhoujun Shen
  • Chong-yu Zhang
  • Wen-bin Rui
  • Wen-long Zhou
  • Fu-kang Sun
  • Guang Ning
Original Article

Abstract

The objective of this article is to evaluate the efficacy of Doxazosin Mesylate Controlled Release Tablets for preoperative treatment of patients with pheochromocytoma. Between 2003 and 2008, 67 patients with confirmed diagnoses of pheochromocytoma were enrolled in this study. According to the drug used in preoperative management, patients were divided into two groups: Doxazosin Mesylate pretreatment group (n = 36) and Phenoxybenzamine pretreatment group (n = 31). Surgery was performed only in patients who met the optimal preoperative condition. The hematocrit decreased significantly (P < 0.001) after antiadrenergic therapy in patients pretreated with phenoxybenzamine or doxazosin. There was no significant difference between the fluid intakes during operation in both groups. The systolic arterial pressures both before and after induction of anesthesia were all significantly higher in the doxazosin patients than in the phenoxybenzamine group (P < 0.05). After tumor removed, the lowest systolic arterial pressure was significantly higher in doxazosin group than in phenoxybenzamine group (P < 0.05). The fluctuation of systolic arterial pressure during operation was more stable in doxazosin group than in phenoxybenzamine group (P < 0.05). Doxazosin mesylate controlled release tablet was as effective as phenoxybenzamine in preoperative volume expansion. Although phenoxybenzamine provided better arterial pressure control, patients pretreated with DOX experienced more stable perioperative hemodynamic changes, shorter preoperative management periods and more simple medication.

Keywords

Pheochromocytoma α-Adrenoceptor antagonist Preoperative management 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by Shanghai Municipal Natural Science Foundation (No. 09ZR1418500), grant from the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yu Zhu
    • 1
  • Hong-chao He
    • 1
  • Ting-wei Su
    • 2
  • Yu-xuan Wu
    • 1
  • Wei-qing Wang
    • 2
  • Ju-ping Zhao
    • 1
  • Zhoujun Shen
    • 1
  • Chong-yu Zhang
    • 1
  • Wen-bin Rui
    • 1
  • Wen-long Zhou
    • 1
  • Fu-kang Sun
    • 1
  • Guang Ning
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Urology, Ruijin HospitalShanghai Jiaotong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina
  2. 2.Department of Endocrinology, Clinical Center of Shanghai Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Ruijin HospitalShanghai Jiaotong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina

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