NeuroMolecular Medicine

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 224–228

No Association of VEGF Polymorphims with Alzheimer’s Disease

  • Sara Landgren
  • Mona Seibt Palmér
  • Ingemar Skoog
  • Lennart Minthon
  • Anders Wallin
  • Niels Andreasen
  • Madeleine Zetterberg
  • Kaj Blennow
  • Henrik Zetterberg
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s12017-009-8096-8

Cite this article as:
Landgren, S., Palmér, M.S., Skoog, I. et al. Neuromol Med (2010) 12: 224. doi:10.1007/s12017-009-8096-8

Abstract

The vascular hypothesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has brought the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into focus. The genomic region including the VEGF gene has been linked to AD and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the VEGF have in previous studies been associated with AD risk. To further evaluate these findings, we genotyped two SNPs in the VEGF gene (rs699947 [−2578]) and rs1570360 [−1154]) by TaqMan Allelic Discrimination in a study sample including AD patients (n = 801) and controls (n = 286). In a subgroup of the population these SNPs were analyzed in relation to APOE ε4 genotype, to cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers (T-tau, P-tau, and β42-Amyloid) as well as to neuropathological markers for AD (neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques). No significant associations with risk for AD or any of the studied biomarkers could be found in this study, thus not supporting VEGF as being a major risk gene for AD.

Keywords

Alzheimer’s disease VEGF Tau β-Amyloid 

Copyright information

© Humana Press Inc. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sara Landgren
    • 1
  • Mona Seibt Palmér
    • 2
  • Ingemar Skoog
    • 3
  • Lennart Minthon
    • 4
  • Anders Wallin
    • 3
  • Niels Andreasen
    • 5
  • Madeleine Zetterberg
    • 6
  • Kaj Blennow
    • 3
  • Henrik Zetterberg
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Neuroscience and PhysiologyThe Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of GothenburgGothenburgSweden
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Chemistry and Transfusion Medicine, Institute of BiomedicineThe Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of GothenburgGothenburgSweden
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry and Neurochemistry, Institute of Neuroscience and PhysiologyThe Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of GothenburgMölndalSweden
  4. 4.Clinical Memory Research Unit, Department of Clinical SciencesLund UniversityMalmöSweden
  5. 5.Memory Clinic M51, Department of Geriatric Medicine, Institute of NeurobiologyCaring Sciences and Society, Karolinska HospitalHuddingeSweden
  6. 6.Department of Clinical Neuroscience and Rehabilitation, Institute of Neuroscience and PhysiologyThe Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of GothenburgMölndalSweden

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