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Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology

, Volume 52, Issue 1, pp 71–80 | Cite as

Serum Jo-1 Autoantibody and Isolated Arthritis in the Antisynthetase Syndrome: Review of the Literature and Report of the Experience of AENEAS Collaborative Group

  • Lorenzo CavagnaEmail author
  • Laura Nuño
  • Carlo Alberto Scirè
  • Marcello Govoni
  • Francisco Javier Lopez Longo
  • Franco Franceschini
  • Rossella Neri
  • Santos Castañeda
  • Walter Alberto Sifuentes Giraldo
  • Roberto Caporali
  • Florenzo Iannone
  • Enrico Fusaro
  • Giuseppe Paolazzi
  • Raffaele Pellerito
  • Andreas Schwarting
  • Lesley Ann Saketkoo
  • Norberto Ortego-Centeno
  • Luca Quartuccio
  • Elena Bartoloni
  • Christof Specker
  • Trinitario Pina Murcia
  • Renato La Corte
  • Federica Furini
  • Valentina Foschi
  • Javier Bachiller Corral
  • Paolo Airò
  • Ilaria Cavazzana
  • Julia Martínez-Barrio
  • Michelle Hinojosa
  • Margherita Giannini
  • Simone Barsotti
  • Julia Menke
  • Kostantinos Triantafyllias
  • Rosetta Vitetta
  • Alessandra Russo
  • Laura Bogliolo
  • Gianluigi Bajocchi
  • Elena Bravi
  • Giovanni Barausse
  • Roberto Bortolotti
  • Carlo Selmi
  • Simone Parisi
  • Fausto Salaffi
  • Carlomaurizio Montecucco
  • Miguel Angel González-Gay
  • on Behalf of AENEAS (American and European NEtwork of Antisynthetase Syndrome) Collaborative Group
Article

Abstract

Anti-Jo-1 is the most frequently detectable antibody in the antisynthetase syndrome (ASSD), an autoimmune disease characterized by the occurrence of arthritis, myositis, and interstitial lung disease (ILD). Recently, we organized an international collaborative group called American and European NEtwork of Antisynthetase Syndrome (AENEAS) for the study of this rare and fascinating disease. The group collected and published one of the largest series of ASSD patients ever described and with one of the longer follow-up ever reported. The number of participating centers is steadily increasing, as well as the available cohort. In the first paper, we showed that arthritis, myositis, and ILD may be frequently the only feature at disease onset, raising problems to reach a correct diagnosis of this syndrome. Nevertheless, we first observed that the ex novo appearance of further manifestations is common during the follow-up, strengthening the importance of a correct diagnosis. In our cohort, the 24 % of the 243 patients up to now collected had isolated arthritis as a presenting feature. These patients represent the most intriguing group in terms of differential diagnosis and clinical time course. Furthermore, data on this aspect are scanty, the reason that lead us to evaluate these aspects in our cohort of patients, reviewing also available literature. In fact, the most relevant aspect is that ASSD is rarely suspected in this setting of patients, in particular in case of poliarticular involvement, positive rheumatoid factor (RF), or anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (ACPA) or evidence of joint erosions at plain radiographs. These findings were not rare in our cohort, and they have been also described in other series. Furthermore, manifestations such as Raynaud’s phenomenon, mechanic’s hands, and fever that may lead to the suspect of ASSD are observed only in a third of cases. If we consider the high rate of clinical picture progression in these patients, we feel that ASSD should be carefully considered in all patients presenting with isolated arthritis, even in those with erosive, RF, and ACPA-positive arthritis.

Keywords

Anti-Jo-1 Antisynthetase syndrome Isolated polyarthritis Rheumatoid factor Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide Clinical time course 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lorenzo Cavagna
    • 1
    Email author
  • Laura Nuño
    • 2
  • Carlo Alberto Scirè
    • 3
  • Marcello Govoni
    • 4
  • Francisco Javier Lopez Longo
    • 5
  • Franco Franceschini
    • 6
  • Rossella Neri
    • 7
  • Santos Castañeda
    • 8
  • Walter Alberto Sifuentes Giraldo
    • 9
  • Roberto Caporali
    • 1
  • Florenzo Iannone
    • 10
  • Enrico Fusaro
    • 11
  • Giuseppe Paolazzi
    • 12
  • Raffaele Pellerito
    • 13
  • Andreas Schwarting
    • 14
  • Lesley Ann Saketkoo
    • 15
  • Norberto Ortego-Centeno
    • 16
  • Luca Quartuccio
    • 17
  • Elena Bartoloni
    • 18
  • Christof Specker
    • 19
  • Trinitario Pina Murcia
    • 20
  • Renato La Corte
    • 4
  • Federica Furini
    • 4
  • Valentina Foschi
    • 4
  • Javier Bachiller Corral
    • 9
  • Paolo Airò
    • 6
  • Ilaria Cavazzana
    • 6
  • Julia Martínez-Barrio
    • 5
  • Michelle Hinojosa
    • 5
  • Margherita Giannini
    • 10
  • Simone Barsotti
    • 7
  • Julia Menke
    • 14
  • Kostantinos Triantafyllias
    • 21
  • Rosetta Vitetta
    • 13
  • Alessandra Russo
    • 13
  • Laura Bogliolo
    • 1
  • Gianluigi Bajocchi
    • 22
  • Elena Bravi
    • 23
  • Giovanni Barausse
    • 12
  • Roberto Bortolotti
    • 12
  • Carlo Selmi
    • 24
  • Simone Parisi
    • 11
  • Fausto Salaffi
    • 25
  • Carlomaurizio Montecucco
    • 1
  • Miguel Angel González-Gay
    • 20
  • on Behalf of AENEAS (American and European NEtwork of Antisynthetase Syndrome) Collaborative Group
  1. 1.Division of RheumatologyUniversity and IRCCS Policlinico S. Matteo FoudationPaviaItaly
  2. 2.Servicio de ReumatologíaHospital Universitario La PazMadridSpain
  3. 3.Epidemiology UnitItalian Society for RheumatologyMilanoItaly
  4. 4.UOC Reumatologia, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria S. AnnaUniversity of FerraraFerraraItaly
  5. 5.Servicio de ReumatologíaHospital General Universitario Gregorio MarañónMadridSpain
  6. 6.Rheumatology UnitUniversity and AO Spedali CiviliBresciaItaly
  7. 7.Division of Rheumatology, Department of Clinical and Experimental MedicineUniversity of PisaPisaItaly
  8. 8.Rheumatology DepartmentHospital Universitario de la Princesa, IIS PrincesaMadridSpain
  9. 9.Department of RheumatologyUniversity Hospital Ramón y CajalMadridSpain
  10. 10.Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine (DIM), Rheumatology UnitUniversity of BariBariItaly
  11. 11.Rheumatology DepartmentCittà Della Salute e della ScienzaTorinoItaly
  12. 12.Rheumatology UnitSanta Chiara HospitalTrentoItaly
  13. 13.Division of RheumatologyMauriziano HospitalTurinItaly
  14. 14.Department of Internal Medicine, Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyUniversity Hospital Johannes-GutenbergMainzGermany
  15. 15.Tulane University Lung Center Tulane/UMC Scleroderma and Sarcoidosis Patient Care and Research Center New OrleansNew OrleansUSA
  16. 16.Systemic Autoimmune Diseases UnitHospital Clínico San CecilioGranadaSpain
  17. 17.Clinic of Rheumatology, Department of Medical and Biological Sciences (DSMB)Santa Maria della Misericordia HospitalUdineItaly
  18. 18.Rheumatology Unit, Department of MedicineUniversity of PerugiaPerugiaItaly
  19. 19.Department for Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, St. Josef KrankenhausUniversity ClinicEssenGermany
  20. 20.Division of Rheumatology, Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, IDIVALUniversity of CantabriaSantanderSpain
  21. 21.ACURA Rheumatology CenterBad KreuznachGermany
  22. 22.Rheumatology Unit, Department of Internal MedicineS.Maria Hospital—IRCCSReggio EmiliaItaly
  23. 23.Rheumatology UnitOspedale Guglielmo da SalicetoPiacenzaItaly
  24. 24.Division of Rheumatology and Clinical ImmunologyHumanitas Research HospitalRozzanoItaly
  25. 25.Rheumatology DepartmentPolytechnic University of Marche, C. Urbani HospitalJesiItaly

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