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Stem Cell Reviews and Reports

, Volume 11, Issue 2, pp 275–279 | Cite as

Family Directed Umbilical Cord Blood Banking for Acute Leukemia: Usage Rate in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

  • M. ScrenciEmail author
  • E. Murgi
  • A. Tamburini
  • M. R. Pecci
  • G. Ballatore
  • A. Cusanno
  • V. Valle
  • P. Luciani
  • F. Corona
  • G. Girelli
Article

Abstract

Family-directed umbilical cord blood (UCB) collection and banking is indicated in women delivering healthy babies who already have a member of their own family with a disease potentially treatable with an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell (HSCs) transplantation (HSCT). The rapid availability of UCB is an important issue in HSCs procurement particularly for recipients with acute leukemia who urgently need HSCT. The aims of this study were to assess the usage rate of family UCB collections directed to patients with acute leukemia and to investigate the factors influencing the usage rate. A total of 113 families were enrolled, 118 UCB units were successfully collected and one collection failed due to emergency occurred during delivery. Among these, 7 collections were required for children who were in urgent need of a transplant: three HLA-matched units were successfully transplanted, respectively after 2, 5 and 6 months from collection; three collections resulted HLA-mismatched, while HLA-typing is pending for one unit. The remaining collections were mostly required for potential future use, among these units only one was transplanted in a HLA compatible sibling after 3 years and 4 months from collection. After a median time of storage of 8.5 years (range 0.1–20 years) a total of 4/118 (3.4 %) collection has been transplanted. During this time interval, considering only patients who have had the need of a transplant, the main factor influencing low utilization rate of UCB collections was due to HLA disparity, indeed among typed UCB unit mostly (77 %) resulted HLA mismatched with the intended recipient.

Keywords

Related cord blood banking Family-directed cord blood banking Acute leukemia Umbilical cord blood transplantation Stem cell transplantation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank all the UCB collection and processing personnel who collaborated in this study.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare no potential conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Screnci
    • 1
    Email author
  • E. Murgi
    • 1
  • A. Tamburini
    • 2
  • M. R. Pecci
    • 4
  • G. Ballatore
    • 2
  • A. Cusanno
    • 3
  • V. Valle
    • 1
  • P. Luciani
    • 5
  • F. Corona
    • 1
  • G. Girelli
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Immunoematologia e Medicina TrasfusionaleAzienda Policlinico Umberto IRomeItaly
  2. 2.Banca del Sangue Placentare, UOC Medicina TrasfusionaleOspedale S. EugenioRomeItaly
  3. 3.Department of Ostetricia e GinecologiaAzienda Policlinico Umberto IRomeItaly
  4. 4.Department of Ostetricia e GinecologiaOspedale F SpazianiFrosinoneItaly
  5. 5.Department of Ostetricia e GinecologiaOspedale S PietroRomeItaly

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