Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics

, Volume 69, Issue 2, pp 209–211

Non-steroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs and Hypertension

Review Paper

Abstract

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently used to alleviate pain of the patients who suffer from inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and other painful conditions like gout. This class of drugs works by blocking cyclooxgenases which in turn block the prostaglandin production in the body. Most often, NSAIDs and antihypertensive drugs are used at the same time, and their use increases with increasing age. Moreover, hypertension and arthritis are common in the elderly patients requiring pharmacological managements. An ample amount of studies put forth evidence that NSAIDs reduce the efficiency of antihypertensive drugs plus aggravate pre-existing hypertension or make the individuals prone to develop high blood pressure through renal dysfunction. This review will help doctors to consider the effects and risk factors of concomitant prescription of NSAIDs and hypertensive drugs.

Keywords

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs Hypertension NSAIDs High blood pressure Prostaglandins Antihypertensive drugs Renal injury 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The Fifth Central Hospital of TianjinTianjinChina

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