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Biological Trace Element Research

, Volume 154, Issue 1, pp 55–61 | Cite as

The Effects of Dietary Supplementation with Chromium Picolinate throughout Gestation on Productive Performance, Cr Concentration, Serum Parameters, and Colostrum Composition in Sows

  • Liansheng Wang
  • Zhan Shi
  • Zhiqiang Jia
  • Binchao Su
  • Baoming Shi
  • Anshan Shan
Article

Abstract

The objective of this study was to determine the effects of supplemental chromium as chromium picolinate (CrPic) on productive performance, chromium (Cr) concentration, serum parameters, and colostrum composition in sows. Thirty Yorkshire sows were bred with semen from a pool of Landrace boars. The sows were equally grouped and treated with either a diet containing 0 (control) or 400 ppb dietary Cr supplementation throughout gestation. The sows received the same basal diet based on corn-DDGS meal. Supplemental CrPic increased (P < 0.05) the sow body mass gain from the insemination to the day 110 of gestation in sows. No differences (P > 0.50) were observed in the gestation interval, sow mass, and backfat at insemination, after farrowing, at weaning and lactation loss. The number of piglets born alive, piglets per litter at weaning, and litter weaned mass were increased (P < 0.05) for those supplemented with CrPic compared with the control. However, the total number of piglets born, total born litter mass, average piglet birth body mass, born alive litter mass, and average born alive piglet mass did not differ among the treatments (P > 0.05). The placental masses of sows were similar among treatments (P > 0.05). Dietary supplementation with CrPic throughout gestation in sows showed increased (P < 0.01) concentration of Cr in the colostrum or serum at days 70 and 110. Compared with the control group, dietary supplementation with CrPic throughout gestation in sows decreased (P < 0.05) the serum insulin concentration, the glucose or serum urea nitrogen concentration at days 70 and 110. However, no differences (P > 0.05) were observed in total protein concentration among treatments. No differences (P > 0.05) were observed in total solids, protein, fat or lactose among sows fed the diets supplemented with CrPic compared with the control. This exciting finding provides evidence for an increase in mass gain and live-born piglets in sows supplemented with CrPic throughout gestation.

Keywords

Chromium picolinate Sow productive performance Serum parameters Colostrum composition 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the National Basic Research Program (2012CB124703) and China Agriculture Research System (CARS-36).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Liansheng Wang
    • 1
  • Zhan Shi
    • 1
  • Zhiqiang Jia
    • 1
  • Binchao Su
    • 1
  • Baoming Shi
    • 1
  • Anshan Shan
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Animal NutritionNortheast Agricultural UniversityHarbinPeople’s Republic of China

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