Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®

, Volume 469, Issue 2, pp 447–453

Bernese Periacetabular Osteotomy in Males: Is There an Increased Risk of Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI) After Bernese Periacetabular Osteotomy?

  • K. Ziebarth
  • J. Balakumar
  • S. Domayer
  • Y. J. Kim
  • M. B. Millis
Symposium: Papers Presented at the Hip Society Meetings 2010

DOI: 10.1007/s11999-010-1544-9

Cite this article as:
Ziebarth, K., Balakumar, J., Domayer, S. et al. Clin Orthop Relat Res (2011) 469: 447. doi:10.1007/s11999-010-1544-9

Abstract

Background

The Bernese periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is a popular option for treating symptomatic acetabular dysplasia. We noted symptomatic impingement after PAO in several male patients.

Questions/purposes

We therefore determined (1) the incidence of clinical signs of FAI after PAO in the male population; and (2) whether any factors were associated with the positive impingement signs after PAO in males.

Patients and Methods

We retrospectively reviewed 38 males who underwent 46 periacetabular osteotomies (PAO) between 2000 and 2007. Clinical and radiographic data were analyzed with the focus on pre- and postoperative incidence of femoroacetabular impingement. Minimum followup was 12 months (average, 43 months; range, 12–90 months).

Results

We found a positive impingement sign in 19 of the 46 hips during the preoperative examination compared to 22 (47.8%) hips postoperatively. The ROM (flexion and internal rotation) decreased postoperatively compared to preoperatively. Radiographic parameters of coverage LCE-, ACE- and Tönnis angle improved into the normal range. Twenty hips had postoperative heterotopic ossification to varying degrees, mostly minor. WOMAC scores improved in the function and pain domains postoperatively.

Conclusions

Despite normalization of coverage we found a high postoperative rate of clinical signs of FAI after PAO in males.

Level of Evidence

Level IV, therapeutic study. See Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Copyright information

© The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons® 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Ziebarth
    • 1
  • J. Balakumar
    • 2
  • S. Domayer
    • 2
  • Y. J. Kim
    • 2
  • M. B. Millis
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryUniversitätsklinik Inselspital, University of BerneBerneSwitzerland
  2. 2.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryAdolescent and Young Adult Hip Unit, Children’s Hospital BostonBostonUSA

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