Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research

, Volume 467, Issue 3, pp 724–731

Surgical Dislocation in the Management of Pediatric and Adolescent Hip Deformity

  • Gleeson Rebello
  • Samantha Spencer
  • Michael B. Millis
  • Young-Jo Kim
Symposium: Femoracetabular Impingement: Current Status of Diagnosis and Treatment

Abstract

The surgical dislocation approach is useful in assessing and treating proximal femoral hip deformities commonly due to pediatric conditions. We sought to demonstrate the efficacy and problems associated with this technique. Diagnoses included slipped capital femoral epiphysis, Perthes disease, developmental dysplasia of the hip, osteonecrosis, and exostoses. Through this approach, femoral head-neck osteoplasty (22), intertrochanteric osteotomy (eight), femoral head-neck osteoplasty plus intertrochanteric osteotomy (15), femoral neck osteotomy (five), open reduction and internal fixation of an acute slipped capital femoral epiphysis with callus resection (five), open reduction and internal fixation of an acetabular fracture (one), trapdoor procedure (one), and acetabular rim osteoplasty (one) were performed. The average patient age was 16 years. The minimum followup was 12 months (average, 41.6 months; range, 12–73 months). Patients with Perthes disease and SCFE had preoperative and postoperative WOMAC scores of 9.6 and 5.1, and 7.9 and 3.5 respectively. In patients with unstable SCFEs, the average postoperative WOMAC score was 1.2. Seven patients underwent THAs and two patients underwent hip fusion. Complications in the 58 procedures included four cases of osteonecrosis: three after femoral neck osteotomy and one after intertrochanteric osteotomy. The surgical dislocation technique can be utilized to effectively treat these deformities and improve short-term symptoms. Although the technique is demanding, we believe surgical dislocation offers sufficient advantages in assessing and treating these complex deformities that it justifies judicious application.

Level of Evidence: Level IV, retrospective study, case series. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

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Copyright information

© The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gleeson Rebello
    • 1
  • Samantha Spencer
    • 1
  • Michael B. Millis
    • 1
  • Young-Jo Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryChildren’s HospitalBoston USA

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