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Science and Engineering Ethics

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 647–649 | Cite as

Is it Suitable for a Journal to Bid for Publishing a Review That is Likely to be Highly Cited?

  • Weishu Liu
  • Junwen Zhu
  • Chao Zuo
  • Haiyan WangEmail author
Letter
  • 105 Downloads

Abstract

By following a recently published paper entitled “The effect of publishing a highly cited paper on a journal’s impact factor: a case study of the Review of Particle Physics” in Learned Publishing, we argue that it is not suitable for journals to bid for the right to publish a review that is likely to be highly cited. A few suggestions are also provided to deal with the special case of the Review of Particle Physics phenomenon.

Keywords

Journal impact factor Highly cited review Review of Particle Physics Conflict of interest 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research is partly funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (#71433006, #91746202, #71373117) and Zhejiang Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (#LQ18G030010). This letter has benefited greatly from the kind help of the editor.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors state that there is no conflict of interest regarding this manuscript.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Information Management and EngineeringZhejiang University of Finance and EconomicsHangzhouChina
  2. 2.Graduate School of EducationShanghai Jiao Tong UniversityShanghaiChina
  3. 3.School of Management and E-BusinessZhejiang Gongshang UniversityHangzhouChina

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