Science and Engineering Ethics

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 861–882

Science Outside the Lab: Helping Graduate Students in Science and Engineering Understand the Complexities of Science Policy

  • Michael J. Bernstein
  • Kiera Reifschneider
  • Ira Bennett
  • Jameson M. Wetmore
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s11948-016-9818-6

Cite this article as:
Bernstein, M.J., Reifschneider, K., Bennett, I. et al. Sci Eng Ethics (2017) 23: 861. doi:10.1007/s11948-016-9818-6

Abstract

Helping scientists and engineers challenge received assumptions about how science, engineering, and society relate is a critical cornerstone for macroethics education. Scientific and engineering research are frequently framed as first steps of a value-free linear model that inexorably leads to societal benefit. Social studies of science and assessments of scientific and engineering research speak to the need for a more critical approach to the noble intentions underlying these assumptions. “Science Outside the Lab” is a program designed to help early-career scientists and engineers understand the complexities of science and engineering policy. Assessment of the program entailed a pre-, post-, and 1 year follow up survey to gauge student perspectives on relationships between science and society, as well as a pre–post concept map exercise to elicit student conceptualizations of science policy. Students leave Science Outside the Lab with greater humility about the role of scientific expertise in science and engineering policy; greater skepticism toward linear notions of scientific advances benefiting society; a deeper, more nuanced understanding of the actors involved in shaping science policy; and a continued appreciation of the contributions of science and engineering to society. The study presents an efficacious program that helps scientists and engineers make inroads into macroethical debates, reframe the ways in which they think about values of science and engineering in society, and more thoughtfully engage with critical mediators of science and society relationships: policy makers and policy processes.

Keywords

Science policy Ethics education Macroethics Science and engineering education Science Policy Evaluation Assessment Experiential learning 

Supplementary material

11948_2016_9818_MOESM1_ESM.docx (32 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 32 kb)

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
National Science Foundation
  • 0531194
  • 0937591

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Bernstein
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kiera Reifschneider
    • 1
  • Ira Bennett
    • 1
    • 3
  • Jameson M. Wetmore
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Center for Nanotechnology in SocietyArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.School of SustainabilityArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  3. 3.Center for Engagement & Training in Science & SocietyArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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