Science and Engineering Ethics

, Volume 8, Issue 3, pp 459–468

Beyond conflict of interest: The responsible conduct of research

Article

Abstract

This paper reports data and scholarly opinion that support the perception of systemic flaws in the management of scientific professions and the research enterprise; explores the responsibility that professional status places on the scientific professions, and elaborates the concept of the responsible conduct of research (RCR). Data are presented on research misconduct, availability of research guidelines, and perceived research quality.

Keywords

responsible conduct of research (RCR) research guidelines scientific professions systemic flaws 

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Copyright information

© Opragen Publications 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Education and IntegrityOffice of Research IntegrityRockvilleUSA

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