Current Treatment Options in Neurology

, Volume 2, Issue 1, pp 51–60 | Cite as

Alzheimer’s disease

  • Armand S. Schachter
  • Kenneth L. Davis
Article

Opinion statement

  • Use of valid diagnostic criteria is extremely important in the recognition of Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

  • Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease should be started on a cholinesterase inhibitor and possibly anti-inflammatory agents, antioxidants (vitamin E or selegiline), and estrogen replacement therapy (for postmenopausal women). Close follow-up of functioning is needed to be able to provide symptomatic relief and possibly slow down the progression of the disease [1].

  • Comorbid medical conditions as well as superimposed psychiatric disturbances should be aggressively treated.

  • Pharmacologic interventions and environmental engineering (including support for family members) should be used throughout the course of the disease.

  • Genetic testing is not recommended in asymptomatic family members [2],[3] considering the enormous potential for job and insurance discrimination.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Armand S. Schachter
    • 1
  • Kenneth L. Davis
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryMount Sinai School of Medicine, Mount Sinai Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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