Current Urology Reports

, Volume 5, Issue 4, pp 280–286 | Cite as

Ejaculatory disorders and lower urinary tract symptoms

  • Robert E. Brannigan
Article

Abstract

A growing body of literature supports the observed association between lower urinary tract symptoms and sexual dysfunction. The causal relationship between these two conditions has not been determined. Ejaculatory function is an important aspect of sexual functioning and recent studies have shown a high prevalence of this ejaculatory dysfunction in men with lower urinary tract symptoms. Furthermore, the degree of bother associated with ejaculatory dysfunction is quite high, making it an important problem for patients. Thus, health care providers should have a heightened sense of awareness for the presence of ejaculatory dysfunction and appropriate patient counseling should be undertaken before initiation of specific treatments for lower urinary tract symptoms.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert E. Brannigan
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Male Reproductive Medicine and Surgery, Department of UrologyNorthwestern University, Feinberg School of MedicineChicagoUSA

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