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Understanding Prostate Cancer in Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men and Transgender Women: A Review of the Literature

  • B. R. Simon RosserEmail author
  • Shanda L. Hunt
  • Benjamin D. Capistrant
  • Nidhi Kohli
  • Badrinath R. Konety
  • Darryl Mitteldorf
  • Michael W. Ross
  • Kristine M. Talley
  • William West
Sexual Orientation and Identity (J Vencill and M Coleman, Section Editors)
  • 12 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Sexual Orientation and Identity

Abstract

Prostate cancer in sexual and gender minorities is an emerging medical and public health concern. The purpose of this review is to summarize the state of the science on prostate cancer in gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBM) and transgender women (TGW). We undertook a literature review of all publications on this topic through February 2017. With 88 unique papers (83 on prostate cancer in GBM and five case reports of prostate cancer in TGW), a small but robust literature has emerged. The first half of this review critiques the literature to date, identifying gaps in approaches to study. The second half summarizes the key findings in eleven areas. In light of this admittedly limited literature, GBM appears to be screened for prostate cancer less than other men, but they are diagnosed with prostate cancer at about the same rate. Compared to other men, GBM have poorer urinary, bowel, and overall quality-of-life outcomes but better sexual outcomes after treatment; all these findings need more research. Prostate cancer in TGW remains rare and under researched, as the literature is limited to single-case clinical reports.

Keywords

Bisexual Cancer Gay Prostate Sexual rehabilitation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This article was developed as part of the Restore study, a National Cancer Institute–funded grant award titled “Understanding the Effects of Prostate Cancer on Gay and Bisexual Men” (grant no. CA182041; principal investigator B. R. S. Rosser). This article was originally published as a chapter in: Jane M. Ussher, Janette Perz and B. R. Simon Rosser (Eds). Gay and Bisexual Men Living with Prostate Cancer: From Diagnosis to Recovery. Harrington Park Press, New York, NY, 2018. Reprinted with Permission.

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Copyright information

© Harrington Park Press 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. R. Simon Rosser
    • 1
    Email author
  • Shanda L. Hunt
    • 2
  • Benjamin D. Capistrant
    • 3
  • Nidhi Kohli
    • 4
  • Badrinath R. Konety
    • 5
  • Darryl Mitteldorf
    • 6
  • Michael W. Ross
    • 7
  • Kristine M. Talley
    • 8
  • William West
    • 9
  1. 1.Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public HealthUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  2. 2.Public Health Library Liaison & Data Curation SpecialistUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  3. 3.School of Social WorkSmith CollegeNorthhamptonUSA
  4. 4.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  5. 5.Department of UrologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  6. 6.Malecare Cancer SupportNew YorkUSA
  7. 7.Department of Family Medicine and community Health, Program of Human SexualityUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  8. 8.School of NursingUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA
  9. 9.Department of Writing StudiesUniversity of MinnesotaMinnesotaUSA

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