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Preclinical Rheumatoid Arthritis and Rheumatoid Arthritis Prevention

  • Kevin D. Deane
Rheumatoid Arthritis (L Moreland, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Rheumatoid Arthritis

Abstract

Purpose of Review

This review is to provide an update on the current understanding of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) development related to disease development prior to the onset clinically apparent synovitis and opportunities for disease prevention.

Recent Findings

A growing number of studies have demonstrated that serum elevations of autoantibodies rheumatoid factor and antibodies to citrullinated protein/peptide antigens (ACPA) are highly predictive of future development of IA/RA. This has underpinned the development of several prevention trials in RA. The full results from most of these prevention trials are pending, but ultimately, they should further inform several critical issues in RA prevention including identification and enrollment of individuals at high risk of imminent RA, the efficacy, safety and cost-effectiveness of prevention, and potentially the identification of new targets for prevention.

Summary

Results from studies in RA prevention as well as other ongoing natural history studies of RA will help to change the paradigm of how RA is managed, potentially adding prevention to the possibilities for management.

Keywords

Rheumatoid arthritis Preclinical Autoantibodies Antibodies to citrullinated protein antigens (ACPA) Rheumatoid factor Rheumatoid arthritis prevention 

Notes

Funding

Dr. Deane’s work on this manuscript has been supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Autoimmune Center of Excellence through grant AI110503.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Dr. Deane reports grants from NIH, during the conduct of the study.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of RheumatologyUniversity of Colorado School of MedicineAuroraUSA

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