Current Rheumatology Reports

, 16:443 | Cite as

Novel Treatments with Small Molecules in Psoriatic Arthritis

Psoriatic Arthritis (O FitzGerald and P Helliwell, Section Editors)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Psoriatic Arthritis

Abstract

Current treatment options for patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) include synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and biologic agents. Propelled by increased understanding of immunopathogenesis of PsA, new therapeutic agents targeting different biologic pathways have been evaluated. This article discusses novel small-molecule, orally available treatments that are currently in clinical development for the treatment of psoriasis and PsA. This includes the phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor apremilast and Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors. Apremilast has demonstrated significant improvements in patients with moderate to severe psoriasis and PsA in phase II and III clinical trials and has recently been approved for the treatment of PsA. Tofacitinib, an oral inhibitor of JAK3, JAK1, and, to a lesser degree, JAK2, approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis in several countries, has demonstrated positive results in psoriasis in phase II studies. Studies in PsA are ongoing. With these new developments, treatment options will continue to improve in the future.

Keywords

Psoriasis Psoriatic arthritis Apremilast Janus kinase inhibitors 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Copenhagen University HospitalsCopenhagenDenmark
  2. 2.Division of Rheumatology, CaliforniaUniversity of California, San DiegoSan DiegoUSA
  3. 3.Department of Internal Medicine and Rheumatology CCopenhagen University Hospital, GentofteHellerupDenmark

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