Current Psychiatry Reports

, Volume 12, Issue 2, pp 88–95 | Cite as

From TADS and SOFTADS to TORDIA and Beyond: What’s New in the Treatment of Adolescent Depression?

  • Zheya Jenny Yu
  • Christopher J. Kratochvil
  • Ronald A. Weller
  • Mira Mooreville
  • Elizabeth B. Weller
Article

Abstract

Major depressive disorder in adolescents is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Major advances have been made in recent years in the treatment of adolescent depression, with promising outcomes. However, limitations of currently available treatments have prompted attempts to better understand pediatric depression from a broader perspective and to develop more effective treatment strategies in the future.

Keywords

Adolescent Depression Pharmacotherapy Cognitive-behavioral therapy 

Notes

Acknowledgment

Dr. Kratochvil is supported by NIMH grant 5K23MH06612701A1.

Disclosure

Dr. Kratochvil receives grant support from Eli Lilly and Company, Abbott Laboratories, and Somerset Pharmaceuticals; serves as a consultant for Eli Lilly and Company, Abbott Laboratories, the Neuroscience Education Institute, MedAvante, AstraZeneca, and Pfizer; serves as editor of the Brown University Child & Adolescent Psychopharmacology Update and a member of the REACH Institute Primary Pediatric Psychopharmacology Steering Committee; and receives a study drug for an NIMH-funded study from Eli Lilly and Company and Abbott Laboratories.

Drs. Ronald and Elizabeth Weller are co-owners of the Children’s Interview for Psychiatric Syndromes (and the parent’s version) and have received annual royalties from copyright ownership of this diagnostic interview. Dr. Elizabeth Weller was the principal investigator for a grant from GlaxoSmithKline to investigate the tolerability and efficacy of lamotrigine in children and adolescents diagnosed with bipolar disorder. No other potential conflicts of interest relevant to this article were reported.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zheya Jenny Yu
    • 1
  • Christopher J. Kratochvil
    • 2
  • Ronald A. Weller
    • 3
  • Mira Mooreville
    • 4
  • Elizabeth B. Weller
    • 5
  1. 1.Hall-Mercer MH/MR Center, Pennsylvania HospitalUniversity of Pennsylvania Health SystemPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.University of Nebraska Medical CenterOmahaUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  5. 5.The Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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