Current Psychiatry Reports

, Volume 8, Issue 5, pp 398–408 | Cite as

Long-term treatment of children and adolescents with attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Article

Abstract

Only 7% to 50% of children with attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder actually are treated. Of those who begin treatment, only 18% to 50% persist in the treatment for any length of time (eg, 2 to 3 years). Thus, available data on effects of long-term medication and psychosocial treatment are sparse and problematic. This article reviews available data on long-term effects of medication (stimulant and nonstimulant) and psychosocial treatment.

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© Current Science Inc 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Child PsychiatryMcGill University, Montreal Children’s HospitalMontrealCanada

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