Current Psychiatry Reports

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 46–51 | Cite as

Personality disorders in children and adolescents

  • Robert F. Krueger
  • Scott R. Carlson
Article

Abstract

The personality disorder (PD) construct continues to be controversial when applied to children and adolescents. Nevertheless, recent research indicates that PDs do occur in youth, and that PDs in youth have meaningful correlates and consequences. We provide a brief review of research on this topic from the past year, and we suggest that evidence for the reality of PDs in youth should be complemented by considerations from the adult PD literature regarding the importance of moving toward a dimensional descriptive system for PDs.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert F. Krueger
    • 1
  • Scott R. Carlson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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