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Current Psychiatry Reports

, Volume 2, Issue 4, pp 335–340 | Cite as

Maximizing treatment outcome in post-traumatic stress disorder by combining psychotherapy with pharmacotherapy

  • Randall D. Marshall
  • Marylene Cloitre
Article

Abstract

There are no systematic data available on combining medication and psychotherapy in the treatment of individuals with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), despite its widespread practice. Careful review of the acute trials literature reveals that psychosocial and pharmacologic treatments each leave a substantial proportion of individuals with residual symptoms. This paper discusses a treatment model involving a phaseoriented treatment approach that begins with pharmacotherapy and continues with trauma-focused psychotherapy. Other combined approaches also are discussed. A rationale supporting the need for psychosocial treatment in the majority of patients who receive pharmacotherapy for chronic PTSD is presented.

Keywords

Fluoxetine Sertraline Ptsd Symptom Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Exposure Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Randall D. Marshall
    • 1
  • Marylene Cloitre
    • 2
  1. 1.Anxiety Disorders ClinicNew York State Psychiatric InstituteNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Payne Whitney ClinicNew York-Presbyterian Hospital, and the Weill Medical College of Cornell UniversityNew YorkUSA

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