Current Prostate Reports

, Volume 3, Issue 4, pp 171–173 | Cite as

Why would men use finasteride in 2005?

  • Reginald Bruskewitz
Article

Abstract

In the late 1800s, reports of treatment for obstructive benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) by bilateral castration in humans were published. Subsequent observations that BPH regressed following castration in male dogs (beagles) generated additional interest in androgen manipulation to treat BPH in humans. Estrogens, aromatase inhibitors, and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone analogs were tested, but were minimally efficacious or caused significant side effects such as sexual dysfunction or cardiovascular events. With the observation that testosterone is converted to dihydrotestosterone and that the dihydrotest-osterone is the more active hormone in prostatic epithelial cell proliferation and maintenance, the concept of 5α-reductase inhibition was developed and clinically tested. Finasteride is a type-2 5-reductase inhibitor and dutasteride is a blocker of type-1 and type-2 reductase. Both are now clinically available.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Reginald Bruskewitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUniversity of Wisconsin Medical SchoolMadisonUSA

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