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Current Pain and Headache Reports

, Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 126–129 | Cite as

Dental presentations of cluster headaches

  • Sheldon G. GrossEmail author
Article

Abstract

Cluster headache has been defined by the International Headache Society (IHS) as one of the primary headaches. A primary headache is a headache that has no other known cause, such as infection or trauma. Cluster headache is also listed as one of the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. These headaches are mediated by the trigeminal nerve with accompanying autonomic symptoms that may range from conjunctival injection, lacrimation, nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, forehead and facial sweating, miosis, and ptosis to eyelid edema. The IHS has described cluster headache as "attacks of severe, strictly unilateral pain that is orbital, supraorbital, temporal or in any combination of these sites, lasting 15 to 180 minutes." In the author’s practice, as a dentist treating orofacial pain, patients with cluster headache have dental or midfacial complaints as a primary presentation. This paper introduces such presentations based on interviews with cluster headache patients, with the main purpose of having midfacial complaints considered as an important presentation to be added to the IHS diagnostic criteria for cluster headache.

Keywords

Migraine Cluster Headache Orofacial Pain Paroxysmal Hemicrania Cluster Headache Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Connecticut Center for Oral and Facial PainBloomfieldUSA

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