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Current Oncology Reports

, 20:5 | Cite as

Yoga for the Management of Cancer Treatment-Related Toxicities

  • Po-Ju Lin
  • Luke J. Peppone
  • Michelle C. Janelsins
  • Supriya G. Mohile
  • Charles S. Kamen
  • Ian R. Kleckner
  • Chunkit Fung
  • Matthew Asare
  • Calvin L. Cole
  • Eva Culakova
  • Karen M. MustianEmail author
Integrative Care (C Lammersfeld, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Integrative Care

Abstract

Purpose of Review

To (1) explain what yoga is, (2) summarize published literature on the efficacy of yoga for managing cancer treatment-related toxicities, (3) provide clinical recommendations on the use of yoga for oncology professionals, and (4) suggest promising areas for future research.

Recent Findings

Based on a total of 24 phase II and one phase III clinical trials, low-intensity forms of yoga, specifically gentle hatha and restorative, are feasible, safe, and effective for treating sleep disruption, cancer-related fatigue, cognitive impairment, psychosocial distress, and musculoskeletal symptoms in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy and radiation and cancer survivors.

Summary

Clinicians should consider prescribing yoga for their patients suffering with these toxicities by referring them to qualified yoga professionals. More definitive phase III clinical trials are needed to confirm these findings and to investigate other types, doses, and delivery modes of yoga for treating cancer-related toxicities in patients and survivors.

Keywords

Yoga Sleep disorder Cancer-related fatigue Cognitive impairment Psychological distress Musculoskeletal symptoms 

Notes

Funding/Support

NIH/NCI 1R01CA181064, NIH/NCI SUG1CA189961, NIH/NCI UG1CA189961, R25 CA102618B

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Po-Ju Lin declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Luke J. Peppone declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Michelle C. Janelsins declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Supriya G. Mohile has served as a consultant for Seattle Genetics.

Charles Kamen declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Ian R. Kleckner is supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute.

Chunkit Fung declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Matthew Asare declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Calvin L. Cole declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Eva Culakova declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Karen M. Mustian declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Po-Ju Lin
    • 1
  • Luke J. Peppone
    • 1
  • Michelle C. Janelsins
    • 1
  • Supriya G. Mohile
    • 2
  • Charles S. Kamen
    • 1
  • Ian R. Kleckner
    • 1
  • Chunkit Fung
    • 2
  • Matthew Asare
    • 1
  • Calvin L. Cole
    • 3
  • Eva Culakova
    • 1
  • Karen M. Mustian
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Surgery, James P. Wilmot Cancer InstituteUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA
  3. 3.Department of OrthopaedicsUniversity of Rochester Medical CenterRochesterUSA

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