Current Oncology Reports

, Volume 14, Issue 5, pp 468–474 | Cite as

Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Melanoma

Melanoma (K Margolin, Section Editor)

Abstract

Adoptive cell therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is arguably the most effective treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma. With higher response rates than ipilimumab or IL-2, and longer durations of response than vemurafenib, TIL therapy carries the potential to transform current outcomes in melanoma, while also defining the way cell-based immunotherapy gets incorporated into mainstream cancer treatment. This paper will review the current state of TIL therapy in melanoma, the strategies to improve its efficacy, the current obstacles, and future directions to expand the availability of TIL to the general patient population.

Keywords

Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes TIL Adoptive cell therapy T cell Melanoma Immunotherapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Medical Oncology, Department of MedicineUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Clinical Research DivisionFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA

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