Current Oncology Reports

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 153–159 | Cite as

Evolving Treatment of Advanced Colorectal Cancer

Article

Abstract

Advances in colorectal cancer treatment have led to improved outcomes for patients. A number of cytotoxic agents, alone and in combination, have shown activity. The addition of the newer, so-called “targeted” agents to standard chemotherapy drugs and regimens has also modestly improved outcomes. Progress in our knowledge and understanding of molecular pathways has led to the identification of markers critical in determining response or nonresponse to some of the targeted agents. This review discusses the available therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer and describes some of the molecular markers implicated in activity and resistance to current targeted therapies.

Keywords

FOLFOX FOLFIRI Bevacizumab Cetuximab Panitumumab KRAS BRAF 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Gastrointestinal Oncology ServiceMemorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer CenterNew YorkUSA

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