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Current Oncology Reports

, Volume 7, Issue 4, pp 255–259 | Cite as

Intensity modulated radiation therapy and proton radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

  • Joe Y. Chang
  • H. Helen Liu
  • Ritsuko Komaki
Article

Abstract

Local failure of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) radiotherapy may cause continuous tumor seeding and death. Radiotherapy dose escalation has been shown to improve local control and survival. However, the toxicities associated with dose escalation are significant and limit the potential of dose escalation. Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) may have the potential to improve the therapeutic ratio for photon treatment of lung cancer by sparing surrounding normal tissues. However, lowdose exposure to normal lung and organ motion is a major concern. We have conducted several studies to address these issues and started clinical studies to evaluate the potential benefit of IMRT in patients with NSCLC. Proton radiotherapy may have greater potential to spare normal tissue and allow for further dose escalation and acceleration. We are conducting preclinical and clinical studies for imaging-guided proton radiotherapy in NSCLC. In this paper, we discuss the preliminary data, IMRT treatment guidelines, and ongoing studies for proton therapy in NSCLC.

Keywords

Radiat Oncol Biol Phys Intensity Modulate Radiation Therapy Proton Radiotherapy Tumor Motion Internal Target Volume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joe Y. Chang
    • 1
  • H. Helen Liu
    • 1
  • Ritsuko Komaki
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiation PhysicsThe University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA

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