Current Oncology Reports

, Volume 5, Issue 5, pp 405–412

Monitoring of acute myeloid leukemia by flow cytometry

  • Wolfgang Kern
  • Susanne Schnittger
Article

Abstract

Monitoring of minimal residual disease (MRD) becomes increasingly important in the risk-adapted management of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In selected patients with AML, multiparameter flow cytometry has shown accuracy and sensitivity in the quantification of MRD levels with independent prognostic impact. The applicability of this approach is superior to that of other methods such as quantitative polymerase chain reaction: Up to 80% of all patients can be monitored by flow cytometry. Nonetheless, significant technical advances are anticipated to extend the applicability of flow cytometry to 100% and to improve its sensitivity. Large clinical trials will determine the role of immunologic monitoring in the prognostic stratification of patients with AML.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang Kern
    • 1
  • Susanne Schnittger
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal Medicine IIILaboratory for Leukemia Diagnostics, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, University Hospital GrosshadernMuenchenGermany

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