The Current State and Future Prospects of Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection Treatment

Transplant and Oncology (M Ison, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Transplant and Oncology

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a significant cause of chronic liver disease with substantial long-term sequelae. Until very recently, therapies to cure HCV were hindered by high nonresponse rates and severe side effects. The first-generation protease inhibitor-containing regimens provided superior cure rates for many HCV-infected patients, although their side-effect profile proved to be quite burdensome. We are now witnessing the emergence of therapies with superior cure rates, limited side effects, and broad genotypic activity. Two therapies, sofosbuvir (an NS5b polymerase inhibitor) and simeprevir (a second-generation NS3/4A protease inhibitor), were approved by the Food and Drug Administration in late 2013 for use in a number of HCV populations. This review focuses primarily upon these therapies and the key studies that support their use in practice. Furthermore, representative novel antiviral therapies, in advanced stages of testing, are also reviewed.

Keywords

Chronic liver disease Cirrhosis Direct-acting antiviral therapies Hepatitis C virus Interferon-free Liver transplantation Ribavirin Simeprevir Sofosbuvir 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Section of Hepatology, Department of MedicineNorthwestern UniversityChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Kovler Organ Transplantation Center, Arkes Family PavilionChicagoUSA

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