Antiretroviral therapy: When to start and which drugs to use

Article

Abstract

US guidelines for treating HIV infection now advocate anti-retroviral therapy (ART) for all HIV-infected patients who have CD4+ T-cell counts less than 350 cells/μL. Treatment is recommended for all pregnant women and patients with AIDS-defining illnesses. At least one major guideline recommends ART for all patients with HIV-associated symptoms. Current first-line treatment for ART-naïve individuals consists of a combination of three agents: two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors plus either one ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitor or one nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI). Although first-line therapies for HIV-infection provide excellent rates of virologic control, ART toxicities remain a challenge.

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Copyright information

© Current Medicine Group LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Emory University School of MedicineAtlantaUSA

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