Current Infectious Disease Reports

, Volume 5, Issue 2, pp 159–165 | Cite as

Type-specific serologic testing for herpes simplex virus-2

  • Peter Leone
Article
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Abstract

Genital herpes due to infection with herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) affects an estimated 60 million adults in the United States. Over 90% are unaware of their infection but are at risk of transmitting HSV to partners. This ongoing “silent” disease is responsible for the continued increase in HSV prevalence. The recent advent of type-specific serologic tests has allowed accurate differentiation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 infection. Screening of at-risk populations will allow identification of individuals with genital herpes and provide an opportunity for risk reduction counseling and interventions to reduce transmission.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2003

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Leone
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Infectious DiseasesUniversity of North CarolinaChapel HillUSA

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