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The Role of Out-of-Clinic Blood Pressure Measurements in Preventing Hypertension

  • Yi Chen
  • Dong-Yan Zhang
  • Yan Li
  • Ji-Guang Wang
Prevention of Hypertension: Public Health Challenges (Y Yano, Section Editor)
  • 149 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Prevention of Hypertension: Public Health Challenges

Abstract

Purpose of Review

One of the possible strategies for preventing hypertension is identifying high-risk people and then implementing lifestyle modifications or therapeutic interventions. Out-of-clinic blood pressure measurements, either home or ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, may identify people with early blood pressure elevation or white-coat or masked hypertension and potentially help prevent hypertension. In this review, we will summarize the evidence on the role of out-of-clinic blood pressure measurements in preventing hypertension either from prehypertension or high normal or elevated blood pressure, or from white-coat or masked hypertension.

Recent Findings

Early blood pressure elevation, either termed as prehypertension or as high normal or elevated blood pressure, identified by home blood pressure monitoring was associated with a 3- to 5-fold risk of sustained hypertension. White-coat and masked hypertension, identified by either home or ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, was associated with a 2- to 4-fold risk of sustained hypertension.

Summary

Out-of-office blood pressure measurements may potentially help prevent hypertension. However, to prove reversibility, controlled clinical trials are required.

Keywords

Blood pressure Hypertension Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring White-coat hypertension Masked hypertension 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest relevant to this manuscript.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yi Chen
    • 1
  • Dong-Yan Zhang
    • 1
  • Yan Li
    • 1
  • Ji-Guang Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Epidemiological Studies and Clinical Trials, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Hypertension, The Shanghai Institute of Hypertension, Department of Hypertension, Ruijin HospitalShanghai Jiaotong University School of MedicineShanghaiChina

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