Current HIV/AIDS Reports

, Volume 11, Issue 3, pp 241–249 | Cite as

HIV-Hepatitis C Virus Co-infection in the era of Direct-Acting Antivirals

  • Kian Bichoupan
  • Douglas T. Dieterich
  • Valérie Martel-Laferrière
Co-infections and Comorbidity (CM Wyatt and K Sigel, Section Editors)

Abstract

Approximately one-third of patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are concomitantly infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). As a result, liver disease remains a major source of morbidity and mortality in HIV patients. Prior to 2011, treatments of HCV lacked efficacy in clinical trials in HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Fortunately, several direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) have now entered clinical practice and others have reached advanced stages of clinical development. These therapies offer significant benefits such as improved rates of sustained virologic response (SVR), shortened durations of treatment, and compatibility with HIV antiretroviral therapies. Treatments such as sofosbuvir (SOF) have received approval for HIV/HCV co-infected patients. Moreover, interferon-free options exist for HIV/HCV co-infected patients who may be ineligible or intolerant of interferon. Despite these improvements, physicians must be aware of the differences between these DAAs, the patient characteristics that play a role on the effectiveness of these medications, and the drug-drug interactions these DAAs may have with existing HIV antiretroviral therapies. The aim of this review is to discuss the prevalence and incidence of HIV/HCV co-infection, critical factors related to patient evaluation, current treatment options, and new developments in the management of HIV/HCV co-infected patients.

Keywords

HIV HIV/HCV co-infection Co-infection HIV/AIDS Sustained virologic response (SVR) Hepatitis C virus (HCV) 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kian Bichoupan
    • 1
  • Douglas T. Dieterich
    • 2
  • Valérie Martel-Laferrière
    • 3
  1. 1.Division of Liver DiseasesMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Division of Liver DiseaseIcahn School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Département de Microbiologie et InfectiologieCentre Hospitalier de l′Université de MontréalMontréalCanada

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