Current HIV/AIDS Reports

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 420–427

Treatment of Genotype 2 and Genotype 3 Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Infection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Positive Patients

HIV/HCV Coinfection (N Terrault, Section Editor)

DOI: 10.1007/s11904-013-0186-4

Cite this article as:
Brown, K., LaBrie, M. & Coffin, C.S. Curr HIV/AIDS Rep (2013) 10: 420. doi:10.1007/s11904-013-0186-4

Abstract

Approximately 25 % of persons living with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are coinfected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In cohort studies of HIV-HCV coinfection, HCV genotypes 2 and 3 account for 15 %–64 % of disease. Compared with HCV monoinfection, liver disease is accelerated in coinfected patients, and anti-HCV treatment is less successful. This article reviews the current knowledge and recommendations for management of HCV genotype 2 and 3 infection in patients living with HIV. While pegylated interferon (PEG-IFN)/ ribavirin (RBV) remains the standard treatment for HCV genotype 2/3 infection, ongoing clinical trials with more effective therapies will soon be available. In particular, an IFN sparing regimen of sofosbuvir/RBV may become available in 2014. It is also evident that HCV genotypes 2 and 3 respond differently to therapy and should be approached differently both in practice and in clinical trials. Issues including drug-drug interactions between anti-HCV and anti-HIV therapies are addressed.

Keywords

HIV HCV Coinfection HCV Genotype 2 and genotype 3 Pegylated-interferon (PEG-IFN) Ribavirin (RBV) Directly acting antiviral agents Boceprevir Telaprevir 

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kristen Brown
    • 1
  • Martin LaBrie
    • 2
  • Carla S. Coffin
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada
  2. 2.Foothills Medical Hospital, Alberta Health Services - Calgary ZoneCalgaryCanada
  3. 3.Liver Unit, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Departments of Medicine and Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious DiseasesUniversity of CalgaryCalgaryCanada

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