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Current HIV/AIDS Reports

, Volume 10, Issue 4, pp 408–419 | Cite as

Treatment of Genotype 1 HCV Infection in the HIV Coinfected Patient in 2014

  • Cody A. Chastain
  • Susanna NaggieEmail author
HIV/HCV Coinfection (N Terrault, Section Editor)

Abstract

Hepatitis C (HCV) coinfection is the leading cause of liver-related morbidity and is a leading cause of mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals in the antiretroviral therapy era. Direct-acting antiviral (DAA) therapies are transforming how HCV is treated with significant improvements in efficacy and tolerability. In this article, DAA agents expected to be available in 2014 are reviewed, including telaprevir, boceprevir, sofosbuvir, simeprevir, faldaprevir, and daclatasvir. Available data regarding clinical efficacy, adverse effects, and drug interactions in HIV-HCV coinfection are discussed. The management of adverse effects of HCV therapy and treatment considerations in patients with cirrhosis are also reviewed.

Keywords

Hepatitis C HIV HIV-HCV coinfection Telaprevir Boceprevir Sofosbuvir Simeprevir Faldaprevir Daclatasvir 

Notes

Compliance with Ethics Guidelines

Conflict of Interest

Cody A. Chastain declares no conflict of interest.

Susanna Naggie declares roles as a Scientific Advisory Board/Consultant for Gilead, Vertex, Boehringer Ingleheim, Abbott, Janssen, and Achillion. Susanna Naggie also declares involvement with research related activities for Gilead, Vertex, AbbVie, BMS, Achillion, and Scynexis.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

Susanna Naggie is an investigator at the Duke Clinical Research Institute and has participated in studies included in this manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Infectious DiseasesVanderbilt University Medical CenterNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke Clinical Research InstituteDurhamUSA

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