Current HIV/AIDS Reports

, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 127–133 | Cite as

Abacavir and Cardiovascular Risk: Reviewing the Evidence

  • Dominique Costagliola
  • Sylvie Lang
  • Murielle Mary-Krause
  • Franck Boccara
Article

Abstract

Since the presentation of the D:A:D study results at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections in February 2008, 10 studies have explored the association between exposure to abacavir and the risk of myocardial infarction. Among the five larger studies, three conclude that there is an association and two that the association is not robust. Based on these studies, it is impossible to refute or confirm a causal relationship, as it is not possible to exclude remaining confounding (smoking in two of the studies, kidney function in two of the studies, cocaine and/or intravenous drug use) and selection bias in studies that report a robust association. In addition, no convincing mechanism has been described.

Keywords

Myocardial infarction Complication of antiretroviral therapy Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors Abacavir HIV infection 

Notes

Disclosure

Dr. Mary-Krause has received honoraria from GlaxoSmithKline. Dr. Boccara has received lecture fees from Gilead Sciences. Dr. Costagliola has received travel grants, consultancy fees, honoraria, or study grants from various pharmaceutical companies, including Abbott, Boehringer-Ingelheim, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Gilead Sciences, GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen-Cilag, Merck Sharp & Dohme-Chibret, and Roche.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dominique Costagliola
    • 1
    • 2
    • 5
  • Sylvie Lang
    • 1
    • 5
  • Murielle Mary-Krause
    • 1
    • 5
  • Franck Boccara
    • 3
    • 4
    • 6
  1. 1.UMR S 943UPMC Univ-Paris 6ParisFrance
  2. 2.Service des Maladies Infectieuses et TropicalesAPHP, Hôpital Pitié-SalpêtrièreParisFrance
  3. 3.Department of Cardiology, Saint Antoine HospitalUniv-Paris 6, AP-HPParisFrance
  4. 4.INSERM, UMR S 938, Faculté de Médecine Saint AntoineParisFrance
  5. 5.UMR S 943INSERMParis Cedex 13France
  6. 6.Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris and Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Cardiology DepartmentSaint-Antoine University and Medical SchoolParis Cedex 12France

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