Current Hepatitis Reports

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 149–156

IL28B Genotype on HCV Infection in Asia

Global Perspectives: Taiwan and Asia (ML Yu and RN Chien, Section Editors)
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Abstract

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the leading cause of cirrhosis, hepatic decompensation, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Successful HCV eradication can reduce the liver-related mortality and morbidity. Previous studies show that Asian HCV-1 patients tend to have higher sustained virologic response (SVR) rates than Caucasian, Hispanic or African-American HCV-1 patients. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) reveal interleukin-28B (IL28B) genotypes at locus rs12979860 or rs8099917 are strong predictors for SVR in HCV-1 patients treated with peginterferon-α (PEG-IFN-α) plus ribavirin (RBV), and the higher frequencies of favorable IL28B genotype in Asian patients than those in other ethnicity may explain the superior response in Asian HCV-1 patients. However, the predictive role of IL28B genotype is limited for HCV-2 patients and for HCV patients with response-guided therapy. IL28B genotype still predicts SVR in patients with triple therapy by telaprevir (TVR) or boceprevir (BOC). For newer direct-acting antivirals (DAAs), its predictive role remains to be confirmed.

Keywords

Hepatitis C virus Interleukin 28B Asia 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineNational Taiwan University College of Medicine and National Taiwan University HospitalTaipeiTaiwan
  2. 2.Hepatitis Research CenterNational Taiwan University College of Medicine and National Taiwan University HospitalTaipeiTaiwan
  3. 3.Graduate Institute of Clinical MedicineNational Taiwan University College of Medicine and National Taiwan University HospitalTaipeiTaiwan

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