Current Hepatitis Reports

, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp 52–61

HCV and HIV Coinfection

  • Vincent Soriano
  • Eugenia Vispo
  • Luz Martin-Carbonero
  • Pablo Barreiro
Article

Abstract

Chronic hepatitis C (CHC) is estimated to affect about 20% of the 34 million individuals currently living with HIV worldwide, with greater rates (~ 75%) in intravenous drug users or persons exposed to blood products. Individuals who are coinfected with HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) show an accelerated course of liver disease, with faster progression to cirrhosis and its clinical complications. The combination of pegylated interferon plus ribavirin given for 6–18 months leads to sustained HCV clearance in no more than half of HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Thus, new direct anti-HCV drugs are eagerly awaited for this population. Appropriate diagnosis and monitoring of CHC, including the use of noninvasive tools for assessing liver fibrosis (eg, elastometry) as well as provision of therapy guided by early viral kinetics and IL28B genotyping, are improving the management of CHC in HIV-infected persons.

Keywords

Hepatitis C HIV Coinfection Liver Interferon Ribavirin Direct-acting antivirals IL28B 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vincent Soriano
    • 1
  • Eugenia Vispo
    • 1
  • Luz Martin-Carbonero
    • 1
  • Pablo Barreiro
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Infectious DiseasesHospital Carlos IIIMadridSpain

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