Current Hepatitis Reports

, Volume 5, Issue 3, pp 108–113 | Cite as

Treatment of nonresponders to standard hepatitis C therapy

Article

Abstract

Over 40% of patients with chronic hepatitis C fail to achieve sustained virologic response to treatment with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. They represent a growing population of patients with chronic hepatitis C. Those more likely to be nonresponders include patients with genotype 1 (especially with high viral load), advanced fibrosis, or HIV coinfection, as well as African Americans. Prior treatment history must be carefully reviewed and the pattern of nonresponse ascertained to formulate appropriate management strategies. Modi.-able factors associated with poor response should be identified prior to retreatment and addressed to improve the efficacy of retreatment. Patients with mild inflammation and mild fibrosis are at low risk of progression to cirrhosis and may reasonably be offered observation with periodic follow-up. The treatment of naïve patients needs to be optimized in order to minimize the growth of the population of “difficult to treat” nonresponders with chronic hepatitis C.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Weill Medical College of Cornell UniversityNew YorkUSA

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