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Anti-CD19 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapies: Harnessing the Power of the Immune System to Fight Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

  • Robert Havard
  • Deborah M. Stephens
B-cell NHL, T-cell NHL, and Hodgkin Lymphoma (J Amengual, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on B-cell NHL, T-cell NHL, and Hodgkin Lymphoma

Abstract

Purpose of Review

This article will review the use of anti-CD19 CAR-T therapy used in relapsed/refractory diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

Recent Findings

The clinical outcomes, safety analysis, and other relevant considerations will be discussed with an emphasis on the most recently published data regarding the ZUMA-1, JULIET, and TRANSCEND NHL-001 trials.

Summary

Anti-CD19 CAR-T therapy is an exciting new therapy now approved and available to patients with relapsed/refractory diffuse large B cell lymphoma. Secondary to the increasing success and availability of these products, caregivers should expect to become familiar with the indications, toxicity, and limitations of these treatment options and when patients should be considered for referral.

Keywords

CAR-T DLBCL Axi-cel CTL019 Liso-cel Chimeric antigen receptor 

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance •• Of major importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Hematology and Hematologic Malignancies, Huntsman Cancer InstituteUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA

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