Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 81–90 | Cite as

What Do We Do with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia with 17p Deletion?

  • L. Sellner
  • S. Denzinger
  • S. Dietrich
  • H. Glimm
  • O. Merkel
  • P. Dreger
  • T. Zenz
Chronic Leukemias (S O’Brien, Section Editor)

Abstract

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with 17p deletion or mutations of the TP53 gene has a very poor outcome. Optimal treatment of these patients remains a major clinical challenge, and disagreement on the optimal treatment approach exists. Conventional chemo-immunotherapy with rituximab in combination with purine analogues yields lower response-rates and less satisfactory results than for CLL patients with intact p53. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation may allow long-term remissions in this challenging group of patients. In this review, we will discuss current treatment options as well as experimental approaches in clinical trials for CLL patients with deleted or mutated TP53. Particular emphasis will be placed on novel agents with the potential to change clinical practice and future perspectives for the management of these “highest risk” patients.

Keywords

CLL Chronic lymphocytic leukemia Allogeneic stem cell transplantation Targeted therapy 17p deletion TP53 p53 MRD BTK 

Notes

Disclosure Statement

L. Sellner: nothing to disclose; S. Denzinger: nothing to disclose; S. Dietrich: nothing to disclose; H. Glimm: nothing to disclose; O. Merkel: nothing to disclose; P. Dreger: nothing to disclose; T. Zenz: received consulting fee or honorarium from GSK; support for travel to meetings for the study or other purposes received by GSK and Roche; payment for lectures, including service on speakers bureaus, received by Celgene; received patents from Boehringer.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Sellner
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Denzinger
    • 2
  • S. Dietrich
    • 2
  • H. Glimm
    • 1
  • O. Merkel
    • 1
  • P. Dreger
    • 2
  • T. Zenz
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Translational OncologyNational Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) and German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ)HeidelbergGermany
  2. 2.Department of Medicine VHeidelberg University Medical CenterHeidelbergGermany

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