Current Hematologic Malignancy Reports

, Volume 4, Issue 4, pp 236–244 | Cite as

Hemopoietic stem cell transplantation in T-cell malignancies: Who, when, and how?

  • Francesco d’Amore
  • Esa Jantunen
  • Thomas Relander
Article

Abstract

Only in recent years has there been a specific focus on the treatment of T-cell lymphomas in general and peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) in particular. An increasing number of PTCL-specific retrospective analyses have been reported, and the first data from PTCL-restricted prospective clinical trials have appeared more recently. In this context, the role of hemopoietic stem cell transplantation—primarily autologous but also allogeneic—has been investigated. High-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (HDT/ASCT) proved feasible in both relapsed/refractory and previously untreated PTCL. Overall results show a more favorable impact when HDT/ASCT is part of first-line therapy rather than salvage treatment. Reported outcomes have varied, often depending on the number of anaplastic large-cell lymphomas in the cohort. In addition, retrospective results usually focus on patients undergoing transplantation, whereas the fraction of patients with primary refractory or early relapsing disease is best described in the intention-to-treat analysis of prospective trials. This article reviews the most recent results of upfront HDT/ASCT consolidation in different subtypes of systemic PTCL. The data on allogeneic stem cell transplantation are more limited, but promising results have recently been reported in the setting of relapsed or primary refractory disease.

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Copyright information

© Current Medicine Group, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francesco d’Amore
    • 1
  • Esa Jantunen
  • Thomas Relander
  1. 1.Department of HematologyAarhus University HospitalAarhus CDenmark

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