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Cardiac Contractility Modulation and Baroreflex Activation Therapy in Heart Failure Patients

  • James A. MannEmail author
  • William T. Abraham
Devices (C Veltmann, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Devices

Abstract

Purpose of Review

Despite advances in medical therapy, heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) is still a leading cause of mortality, hospitalizations, and healthcare costs. In this review, we describe two novel, implantable devices for the treatment of patients with HFrEF, cardiac contractility modulation (CCM), and baroreflex activation therapy (BAT), and summarize literature regarding these devices from the last 5 years.

Recent Findings

CCM improves quality of life and functional capacity as assessed by the Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire (MLHFQ) score, 6-min hall walk test (6MHWT) distance, New York Heart Association (NYHA) functional class, peak oxygen consumption (pVO2), heart failure (HF) hospitalizations, and mortality. BAT improves MLHFQ, 6-min walk test distance, NYHA functional class, and HF hospitalizations. Both devices have been shown to be safe.

Summary

CCM and BAT have been shown to be safe and effective treatment modalities for HFrEF. CCM has been approved for use in Europe and has been implanted in thousands of patients. BAT has also been approved in Europe and continues to show promise in treating patients with HFrEF who fail optimal medical therapy (OMT). At present, both therapies are considered investigational in the USA.

Keywords

Cardiac contractility modulation Baroreflex activation therapy Device therapy for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

James Mann declares he has no conflict of interest.

William Abraham has received consulting fees and speaking honoraria from CVRx and are members of the CVRx Heart Failure Executive Steering Committee and he has received consulting fees from Impulse Dynamics.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

All reported studies/experiments with human or animal subjects performed by the authors have been previously published and complied with all applicable ethical standards (including the Helsinki declaration and its amendments, institutional/national research committee standards, and international/national/institutional guidelines).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of Cardiovascular MedicineWexner Medical Center at The Ohio State UniversityColumbusUSA

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