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Clinical Review on the Utility of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Immunocompromised Patients

  • Hamzah Abu-Sbeih
  • Faisal S. Ali
  • Yinghong WangEmail author
GI Oncology (R Bresalier, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on GI Oncology

Abstract

Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) represents a promising management modality for Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). In immunocompromised patients, FMT is utilized for CDI as well as emerging non-CDI indications such as inflammatory bowel disease and graft versus host disease.

Purpose of Review

This review aims to shed light on the safety and efficacy of FMT in immunocompromised patients, including patients suffering for human immunodeficiency virus infection, solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, cancer patients, and patients on immunosuppressive therapies.

Recent Findings

Though the body of evidence concerning the use of FMT in immunocompromised is growing, no clinical trials exist to date.

Summary

Present literature weighs in favor of FMT in immunocompromised patients, with an acceptable adverse effect profile and minimal risk of infectious adverse events. Further large scale studies and randomized controlled trials to validate the utility of FMT in immunocompromised individuals will be a welcomed endeavor.

Keywords

Fecal microbiota transplantation Immunosuppression Solid organ transplant Hematopoietic stem cell transplant Adverse events Aspiration Infection 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hamzah Abu-Sbeih
    • 1
  • Faisal S. Ali
    • 2
  • Yinghong Wang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and NutritionThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Internal MedicinePresence Saint Joseph HospitalChicagoUSA

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