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The Role of Diet in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

  • Raina Shivashankar
  • James D. LewisEmail author
Inflammatory Bowel Disease (S Hanauer, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Abstract

Purpose of Review

Diet may play both a causal and therapeutic role for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Physicians caring for patients with IBD are often asked to make dietary recommendations. However, there are no well-established guidelines on the use of diet as a treatment of IBD. In this review, we describe the evidence supporting diet as a potential cause for IBD, patient-perceived symptoms based on diet, current research on various diets as a treatment for IBD, and areas of future research.

Recent Findings

New studies in murine models suggest that dietary emulsifiers may trigger the gut inflammatory cascade. New studies of restriction diets in patients have shown a relationship between dietary intake, symptoms, and bowel inflammation.

Summary

Until several ongoing clinical trials are completed, a reasonable approach to dietary recommendations for patients with IBD is to propose a well-balanced, healthy (low-fat, low-sugar) diet prepared from fresh ingredients, such as the Mediterranean diet, with exclusions of self-identified foods that worsen or trigger IBD-related symptoms.

Keywords

Inflammatory bowel disease Diet IBD therapy IBD pathogenesis 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Raina Shivashankar declares no conflict of interest.

James Lewis has received honorarium for consulting and research grant support from Nestle Health Science.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

Disclosures

Dr. Lewis has received research funding from Nestle Health Science.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Division of GastroenterologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Center for Clinical Epidemiology and BiostatisticsUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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