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Current Diabetes Reports

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 481–487 | Cite as

Antioxidants and Diabetic Retinopathy

  • Michael Williams
  • Ruth E. Hogg
  • Usha Chakravarthy
Microvascular Complications-Retinopathy (JK Sun, Section Editor)

Abstract

The biochemical perturbations in diabetes mellitus (DM) create the conditions for the production of free radicals, the consequence of which is increased oxidative stress. Evidence has accrued over the past 2 decades that suggests that oxidative stress is an important pathogenetic factor in the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Experimental data show that the use of strategies that ameliorate oxidative stress can prevent and retard the development of DR in the animal model. Clinical observations also suggest that reducing oxidative stress may help to reverse pathological manifestations of DR. The present article constitutes an examination of the role of antioxidants in the management of DR and the current state of clinically relevant knowledge.

Keywords

Oxidation Antioxidants Reactive oxygen species Retinopathy Diabetes 

Notes

Conflict of Interest

Michael Williams declares that he has no conflict of interest.

Ruth Hogg declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Usha Chakravarthy declares that she has no conflict of interest.

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Williams
    • 1
  • Ruth E. Hogg
    • 2
  • Usha Chakravarthy
    • 2
  1. 1.Medical Ophthalmology, Department of OphthalmologyRoyal Victoria Hospital, Belfast Health and Social Care TrustBelfastUK
  2. 2.Centre for Vision and Vascular ScienceQueen’s University of Belfast, Institute of Clinical Science Block A, Royal Victoria HospitalBelfastUK

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