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Current Cardiology Reports

, 20:71 | Cite as

Cardiovascular Risk Assessment in Patients with Hypertriglyceridemia

  • Matthew C. Evans
  • Tapati Stalam
  • Michael Miller
Lipid Abnormalities and Cardiovascular Prevention (G De Backer, Section Editor)
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. Topical Collection on Lipid Abnormalities and Cardiovascular Prevention

Abstract

Purpose of Review

Assessing the cardiovascular risk associated with hypertriglyceridemia can be challenging due to frequent confounding conditions such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hyperlipidemia. We sought to quantify this risk by examining several meta-analyses as well as subgroup analyses of previously published major randomized controlled trials that focused on the treatment of hyperlipidemia.

Recent Findings

Recent trials measuring the effects of PCSK9 inhibitors such as evolocumab and alirocumab on cardiovascular outcomes have demonstrated a high degree of residual cardiovascular risk even after profound reductions in low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C).

Summary

Despite optimization of LDL-C through the use of statins, PCSK9 inhibitors and adjunctive therapies such as ezetimibe, bile acid sequestrants and niacin, residual cardiovascular risk remains significant. Several ongoing trials are assessing the efficacy of pemafibrate and omega-3 fatty acids for the treatment of hypertriglyceridemia and their effects on major cardiovascular outcomes.

Keywords

Hypertriglyceridemia Hyperlipidemia Risk assessment 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

Matthew C. Evans, Tapati Stalam, and Michael Miller declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Michael Miller is a member of the Steering Committee for the REDUCE IT Study and consultant for Amarin.

Human and Animal Rights and Informed Consent

This article does not contain any studies with human or animal subjects performed by any of the authors.

References

Papers of particular interest, published recently, have been highlighted as: • Of importance

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew C. Evans
    • 1
  • Tapati Stalam
    • 1
  • Michael Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine DivisionUniversity of Maryland School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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