Current Cardiology Reports

, Volume 8, Issue 6, pp 405–410

Hypertension in black Americans as a special population: Why so special?

Article

Abstract

Studies have shown that appropriate treatment of hypertension will reduce cardiovascular, renal, and cerebrovascular morbidity and mortality for all patients. Because hypertension has a multifaceted nature the disorder presents with unique features in prevalence, morbidity, and mortality among ethnic groups. Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans have been identified as special populations at risk for unique experiences with hypertension. Among these special populations, black Americans present unique issues in etiology, pathophysiology, severity, and response to treatment. This article reviews the varied aspects of hypertension detection, treatment, and control as they relate to the special population of black Americans.

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Copyright information

© Current Science Inc 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Section of Hypertension, Division of CardiologyUniversity of Maryland School of MedicineBaltimoreUSA

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